Does anyone else miss Heroic Fantasy?

Posted by on Jun 19, 2011 in heroic fantasy | 0 comments

Just a great story with great characters about people fighting nearly impossible odds to try to do what’s right? With good guys, and bad guys, and characters who want to do good, and some who think they are but aren’t? I know I do and did. That’s part of the reason I write them…

Setting Boundaries – After centuries of war an uneasy peace has finally been negotiated between Elves, Dwarves and Men, thanks to Elon of Aerilann, Elven councilor to the High King. One final task yet remains, one last bone of contention – to set the boundaries between their lands. It’s a task that will be easier said than done. Although the lesser Kings signed the Alliance not all of them wish to see it succeed, and some are willing to oppose it. Violently.
For journeyman wizard Jareth it’s the opportunity of a lifetime. Unlike many he’s long admired the calm, seemingly aloof Elves, especially Elon of Aerilann and his paxman Colath.
What he doesn’t know is that the journey they will share will test him to his limits and forge friendships that will last for centuries. 



Kindle http://www.amazon.co.uk/Setting-Boundaries-novella-Coming-ebook/dp/B004RJ7X50/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1308485473&sr=1-3

Smashwords
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/43794

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Holding out for a hero

Posted by on Jun 13, 2011 in #writing | 3 comments

I miss heroes. The real ones, not the surly, lip-curling badass on a motorcycle, the alpha male who treats a woman like a helpless idiot, but the real ones. You know, the good old-fashioned kind of hero, the average guy just trying to do what’s right, or who finds himself caught up in a situation he can’t turn his back on.
What brought this up? Someone mentioned the difference between the (relatively) new Cape Fear movie with Nick Nolte and Robert DeNiro and the old version with Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum.
In the new version, under the frequently misguided decision to add ‘flaws’ to the lead character, they made Nolte a shadier character than Peck was in the original and that took some of the edge away for me right off the bat. In the original, Peck is a lawyer trying to do a decent job but Mitchum blames him for not getting him off. Right away, you’re rooting for Peck. And the burly Mitchum is clearly a tough guy, while Peck isn’t. The odds are clearly stacked against him, setting up the ending.
There are some who would argue that heroes should have flaws and I couldn’t agree more. But most of the true life heroes you see aren’t six foot six biker type dudes in leather. In most cases, those are the bad guys. The real heroes are the firefighters, the policemen, the citizen soldiers. If you look at them, they come in all shapes and sizes. All of them have problems and issues, the same kind many of the antiheroes do.
Our society sometimes almost seems to encourage our helplessness – you can’t fight city hall, don’t get involved.
There’s a TV show out of Canada, called Flashpoint, that epitomizes what I’m talking about. Oh they’ve got a pretty guy, but the two leads Enrico Colantani and Hugh Dillon aren’t your classic hero types. Both are follically challenged *grins* but Hugh could park his shoes under my bed any day. Just don’t tell my husband that – although to tell the truth what got me a little about him was his slight resemblance to another ‘everyday’ hero – Michael Biehn from Terminator.
I think of the volunteer firefighters in most communities, who risk their lives to save those in burning homes. And I think of the soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan or the men who ran INTO the Towers that day. You look at their pictures and you see extra-ordinary men – who put their lives on the line every day. We should celebrate, and write about, those heroes. And remember the ones who inspired them.

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Valerie Douglas, Author is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache